YOGA ASANAS FOR EACH DOSHA

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Yoga for ur Dosha w LilyPod http://lilypodyoga.comhttp://lilypodyoga.com

YOGA FOR YOUR DOSHA

VATA

  • Seated forward bend, child’s pose, vipariate Karani, janu-sirsasana, paschimottanasana & parivrtta, supra-virasana, upavistha-konasana and all variations, alligator twists, kurmasana, yoga mudrasana, eka pada rajakapotanasana, parsva upavistha konasana, SAVASANA.

PITTA

  • Salamba sarvangasana, adho mukha svanasana, supta padangusthasana, parsva upavistha konasana, any seated twist and variations, alligator twist, siddhasana, parivrtta janu sirsasana, trikonasana and parivrtta, marichyanasa I, II,, III, bharadvajasana, setu bandha sarvangasana, viparita karani, pincha mayurasana, SAVASANA

KAPHA

  • Surya namakar, adho mukha svanasana, vrksasana, trikonasana & parivrtta, virabhadrasana I, II, III, and reverse, SIRSASANA, salabhasana, navasana, upavsitha konasana, ardha chandrasana, purvottanasana, pincha mayurasana, dhanurasana, & urdhva, eka pada rajakapotanasana, vasisthasana, parivrtta janu sirsasana, short SAVASANA.

 

 

Seasonal guidelines for the Doshas (Vata – Pitta – Kapha)

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SEASONS

ALL THE INFO BELOW WAS TAKEN FROM BANYEN BOTANICALS.COM, AN EXCELLENT SOURCE FOR AYURVEDA PRODUCTS AND INFO.

VATA – FALL SEASON GUIDELINES: 

Fall is a time of transition. It is evident everywhere around you. Many trees and shrubs are quietly undressing in preparation for the winter. There is a subtle browning of the earth. Temperatures, which, just a few weeks ago were raging with the intense heat of summer, are beginning to hint at the telltale crispness of autumn. And there is the wind: slowly gathering strength, carrying the tides of winter on its breath. The autumn harbors a certain emptiness that can leave us feeling exposed and a little raw, but it is also filled with possibility—a time when we, too, can strip down to a quiet essence of being and savor the simplicity. The fall brings with it a predominance of air element and prana (the vital breath, the subtle essence of life) is abundant in the atmosphere. Autumn is dry, rough, windy, erratic, cool, subtle, and clear. These are all qualities shared by vata dosha, and because like increases like, autumn is considered a vata season. This same principle illustrates why taking a few simple steps to balance vata this fall can be tremendously beneficial.

Why Bother with a Seasonal Routine?

Ayurveda considers a seasonal routine an important cornerstone of health, year around. Balancing the nature of your local climate with lifestyle choices that offset the potential for seasonally-induced imbalances is one of the simplest ways that you can protect your well-being. But keep in mind that the seasons vary widely from one place to another, as do the qualities that they engender. “Vata season” is whatever time of year most embodies the attributes that characterize vata dosha: dry, light, cold, rough, subtle, mobile, and clear (or empty). Autumn is the classic vata season. However, depending on where you live, the dry and expansive qualities of vata may be prevalent components of your environment as early as summer, and the autumn may be followed by a very drying, cold, isolating, and/or windy winter.

Beginning to observe your environment from this qualitative perspective empowers you to respond to both daily and seasonal fluctuations in your local climate. The truth is that many of us adopt seasonally appropriate habits already, without even being conscious of doing so. For instance, summer is a time when we often enjoy salads and watermelon in abundance, both perfect antidotes to the heat and intensity of the summer. Whereas by October and November, we’re often baking delicious pumpkin breads and dining on hearty, grounding soups—foods that naturally subdue the dry, light, and erratic nature of the fall. By making diet and lifestyle choices that counter the effects of each season, you can better maintain your internal sense of equilibrium throughout the year.

Navigating Vata Season Gracefully

If we consider the Ayurvedic principle that opposites balance, vata season (which is cool, light, dry, windy, and unpredictable) will be less aggravating if you fill it with warmth, oiliness, deep nourishment, loving relationships, and a sense of stability, routine, and groundedness. In addition, you may find it helpful to familiarize yourself with signs and symptoms of vata imbalance so that you are better prepared to address those immediately, if they do arise. The following recommendations are appropriate for most people, but if you know your constitution or your current state of balance, you can tailor your seasonal routine appropriately. Below the general recommendations that follow, you will find links to more dosha-specific considerations.

Vata Season Diet

Your diet is a powerful way to soothe vata this fall. Substantive, oily, nourishing foods that are high in protein, high in fat, brought to life with warming, stimulating spices, and served hot, will go a long way toward maintaining your internal reserves of moisture and keeping you grounded through the vata season. You’ll also want to favor the sweet, sour, and salty tastes. In general, eat mushy, soft foods and garnish them generously with ghee or oil. Breakfasts of cooked grains—like oatmeal, tapioca, cream of rice, and cream of wheat—are perfect at this time of year. Lunches and dinners that include steamed vegetables, hearty grains, soups, and stews are grounding and moisturizing. If you eat meat and eggs, this is one of the best times of year to enjoy them. Dairy products and most nuts and seeds are also beneficial. In general, you’ll want to reduce your consumption of raw vegetables, cold and frozen foods, as well as the bitter, pungent, and astringent tastes. It is best to minimize light, cooling, and drying foods like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, sprouts, leafy greens, white potatoes, beans, popcorn, crackers, millet, and dried fruit. If you do eat these foods, eat them in moderation and make sure that they are soaked, well cooked, or served with ghee.

You may find that, during the course of the fall, you’ll naturally want to increase your intake of food, but be careful to follow the lead of your appetite and digestion. This is also a great time of year to do a monodiet type of cleanse. Vata requires adequate nourishment so it is best to avoid fasting.

The following is a list of ideal vata season foods:

Fruits to Favor

  • Apples (cooked)
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Grapes
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Mangoes
  • Oranges
  • Papayas
  • Prunes (soaked)
  • Raisins (soaked)
  • Tangerines

Vegetables to Favor

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Chilies
  • Garlic
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Pumpkins
  • Squash, Winter
  • Sweet Potatoes

Grains to Favor

  • Brown Rice
  • Oats
  • Quinoa
  • Wheat

Legumes to Favor

  • Kidney Beans
  • Miso
  • Urad Dal

Nuts and Seeds to Favor

  • All nuts and seeds are supportive of vata season

Dairy to Favor

  • Butter
  • Buttermilk
  • Cheese
  • Milk (not cold)
  • Sour Cream
  • Yogurt

Animal Products to Favor (If You Eat Them)

  • Beef
  • Buffalo
  • Chicken
  • Crab
  • Duck
  • Eggs
  • Fish
  • Lobster
  • Oysters
  • Shrimp
  • Turkey
  • Venison

Oils to Favor

  • Olive Oil
  • Peanut Oil

Sweeteners

  • Honey
  • Jaggary
  • Maple Syrup
  • Molasses
  • Rice Syrup
  • Sugar (Raw)

Spices to Favor (All Spices Are Good for Vata Season)

  • Allspice
  • Anise
  • Asafoetida (Hing)
  • Basil
  • Bay Leaf
  • Black Pepper
  • Cardamom
  • Nutmeg
  • Oregano
  • Paprika
  • Parsley
  • Rosemary
  • Saffron
  • Turmeric

Vata Season Lifestyle Choices

One of the most effective ways to support vata is by establishing a daily routine. Try to do the same things (wake up, exercise, eat meals, go to bed, etc.) at roughly the same times each day. Set the tone for your day by rising early, taking full advantage of the silence, stillness, and peace that are intrinsic to the early morning hours. Then, you can calm your nervous system, awaken your tissues, and ground your energy by massaging your skin with warm, organic Sesame Oil. Follow this practice with a warm, relaxing shower, leaving a coat of oil on the skin to absorb throughout the day. Steam baths and humidifiers can help to preserve internal moisture as well. Some gentle yoga, and ten to fifteen minutes of meditation will further your sense of stability and wellness. If you enjoy a little fragrance, vetiver, geranium, and citrus essential oils are very appropriate this time of year. Dress in autumn colors when appropriate—reds, yellows, oranges and whites—and wear enough clothes that you stay warm throughout the day. When you step out into the elements, cover your head and ears to protect them from the biting wind and cold. If possible, minimize your exposure to drafts, loud noise, aggressive music, fast driving, and excessive sexual activity. Try to be in bed by 10 p.m. so that you get plenty of rest before dawn.

Vata Season Exercise

The best times of day to exercise are in the early morning and evening hours (6–10 a.m. and 6–10 p.m.). Vata is very easily aggravated by fast, mobile activities, so consider slow, gentle, strengthening forms of exercise instead. Walking, hiking, swimming, biking, yoga, and tai chi are good choices, provided they are done at an appropriate level of intensity. Ideally, exercise at about fifty to seventy percent of your capacity, breathing through your nose the entire time. And remember to balance your activity with adequate relaxation and sleep so that your tissues can rejuvenate properly.

Vata Season Yoga

Incorporating a sense of warmth, grounding, stability, and focus into your yoga practice has a profoundly calming effect on vata and can work wonders during vata season. Your breath should be deep and fluid. If you practice pranayama (yogic breathing exercises), alternate nostril breathing is very balancing this time of year. In your asana practice, favor vata-pacifying yoga. Warm up slowly and include some joint rotations. Move with intention and fluidity—grounding the hands and the feet on the mat whenever possible—and avoid jumping between postures. Gentle flows like a relaxed sun salutation are perfect for vata. You can also favor standing and balancing poses such as mountainwarrior Iwarrior II, and tree pose to increase stability and strength. Connect with the earth beneath you in poses such as thunderboltcat-cowcobra, and child’s pose, and quiet the mind with forward bends such as intense westward stretch. Gentle inversions and restorative poses such as legs up the wall are also very good for vata. Close your practice with a long corpse pose, covering yourself with a blanket so that you don’t get chilled.

 

KAPHA – WINTER SEASON GUIDELINES

Ahh. Take a slow, deep breath…winter is here. Everywhere around you the natural world is withdrawing, going dormant, and embracing a long, dark, season of slumber. There is a particular stillness that characterizes winter, and with it comes a subtle invitation to redirect our own energies. The winter season holds the perfect antidote to the fast-paced mobility of the summer and fall. This is a time to rest, reflect, hold space, vision, hibernate, withdraw some of your outwardly-focused energy and redirect it inward. Unfortunately, the calm, peaceful nature of the winter can also seem a bit oppressive at times, and can leave us feeling weighed down, stagnant, or uninspired. And actually, every season can either bolster or encumber your sense of well-being.

Ayurveda teaches us that like increases like and that opposites balance. As a result, the same experience can affect two different people in dramatically different ways, depending on his/her inner nature. Each of the seasons ushers in a unique set of qualities that can either pacify or aggravate the inner workings of your being. This is why some people relish the heat of the summer while others loathe it, why some can spend an entire winter playing in the snow while others avoid it like the plague. But regardless of who you are, your local climate is a key player in your overall state of balance. This is precisely why a seasonal routine is so important and, in truth, so helpful. By adapting your diet and lifestyle to better accommodate the changing seasons, you can drastically reduce the likelihood of any seasonally-induced imbalances and, should they arise, the same strategies will gently coax your body back toward its natural state of equilibrium.

Winter: A Kapha Season with Strong Vata Undertones

Winter is characterized by cold weather, a sense of heaviness, increased moisture (usually in the form of rain or snow), cloud-covered days, and the grounded, slow feeling that sends many animals into hibernation. These are all qualities shared by kapha dosha, which is why winter is considered to be—primarily—a kapha season. However, if your climate is exceptionally cold and dry, or if you tend to feel more isolated during the winter months, vata will also be a strong component of your winter season, and you will want to actively keep vata placated as well.

General Recommendations for a Delightful and Invigorating Winter

The following information will help you to understand the general premise of a winter routine and is intended to provide a good starting place for adapting your own. You may also find it helpful to familiarize yourself with the common manifestations of both kapha imbalance and vata imbalance so that you can address them quickly, if they do arise. And, if you know your constitution, you can further refine your winter routine to better support your specific body type. After you’ve read the general information that follows, click on your Ayurvedic body type (links below) for further considerations specific to your constitution.

A Supportive Winter Diet

Winter is actually the season when the digestive fire is strongest. The body requires more fuel to stay warm and healthy in the winter months, and the cold weather forces the fire principle deep into the core of the body—igniting the digestive capacity. Our bodies therefore crave a more substantial, nutritive diet at this time of year, and you will likely find yourself eating larger quantities of food. A supportive winter diet will be aimed at pacifying kapha without increasing vata or visa versa and, for many, appropriate winter dietary habits actually come quite naturally.

In general, you’ll want to focus on eating warm, cooked, slightly oily, well-spiced foods, favoring a balance of the sweet, sour, salty, pungent, bitter, and astringent tastes. Drink room temperature, warm, or hot beverages and avoid iced or chilled drinks, if possible. You can increase heat and circulation while encouraging clean and clear respiratory passages by drinking a tea boiled for five minutes with ½ teaspoon each of dried gingercinnamon, and clove. Teas made with combinations of gingercinnamon, and black pepper or coriander seedscumin seeds, and fennel seedsencourage strong digestion and can be taken after meals. Hearty, heating vegetables like radishes, cooked spinach, onions, carrots, and other root vegetables are generally well received this time of year, as are hot spices like garlic, ginger, black pepper, cayenne, and chili peppers. Cooked grains like oatmeal, cornmeal, barley, tapioca, rice, or kitchari make a terrific breakfast, and lunches and dinners of steamed vegetables, whole wheat breads, and mushy soups are ideal.1 Legumes are generally good for kapha, but they should be well-cooked, well-spiced, and garnished with a dollop of ghee so as not to aggravate vata. If you eat them, winter is also a great time to enjoy eggs (especially poached or hard-boiled) and meats like chicken, turkey, rabbit, and venison. In the evenings—either before or after dinner—you can treat yourself to a few ounces of dry, red wine.2 And while dairy is best reduced in the winter months, a cup of hot, spiced milk with a pinch of turmeric or dried ginger and nutmeg before bed can help to encourage sound sleep and should not be overly congesting. It is best to reduce or avoid cold, damp foods, excessively sweet foods, overly heavy or oily foods, and frozen foods. You may also find that your body responds well to an occasional one-day water or juice fast. In fact, if you are prone to kapha imbalances like colds, coughs, and sinus congestion, the junction between fall and winter is a great time to do a cleanse.

The following is a list of ideal winter foods:

Fruits to Favor

  • Apples (cooked)
  • Apricots
  • Bananas
  • Berries
  • Cantaloupe
  • Cherries
  • Dates
  • Figs
  • Grapefruit
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Mangoes
  • Oranges
  • Papaya
  • Peaches
  • Prunes (soaked)
  • Tangerines

Vegetables to Favor

  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Chilies
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Garlic
  • Green Beans
  • Greens (cooked)
  • Mushrooms
  • Leeks and Onions
  • Okra
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
  • Spinach (cooked)
  • Winter Squash
  • Turnips

Grains to Favor

  • Amaranth
  • Barley
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn
  • Rice, Brown
  • Rye
  • Seitan
  • Wheat

Legumes to Favor

  • Lentils, Brown
  • Lentils, Red
  • Miso
  • Tofu
  • Tur Dal
  • Urad Dal

Nuts and Seeds to Favor

  • Almonds
  • Brazil Nuts
  • Cashews
  • Hazelnuts
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans
  • Pine Nuts
  • Pistachios
  • Walnuts
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Sunflower Seeds

Dairy to Favor

  • Butter
  • Soft Cheeses
  • Cottage Cheese
  • Cow’s Milk (not cold)
  • Goat’s Milk (not cold)
  • Sour Cream

Animal Products to Favor (If You Eat Them)

  • Eggs
  • Freshwater Fish
  • Poultry
  • Rabbit
  • Shrimp
  • Venison

Oils to Favor

  • Almond Oil
  • Corn Oil
  • Flax Seed Oil
  • Ghee
  • Mustard Oil
  • Olive Oil

Sweeteners

  • Honey
  • Jaggary
  • Molasses

Spices to Favor

  • All spices will generally be supportive during the winter months

A Supportive Winter Lifestyle

In general, you’ll want to cultivate a light heart and a sharp sense of purpose this winter in order to counter the cold, gray weather and the seasonal tendency toward melancholy and loneliness. Invite warmth into your mind, body, and relationships, and create frequent opportunities for fun and laughter. Try to avoid rushing. Instead, make a concerted effort to embrace a slower, more relaxed pace through the winter months. This is a great time to engage in meaningful relationships and to socialize, but balance your gregariousness with some quiet time, reflection, and stillness. After all, the slow, heavy qualities of the winter months offer a rare opportunity to retreat and check in with ourselves.

Maintaining a predictable routine will help keep vata in balance this winter and kapha will benefit from keeping things fresh and a bit unpredictable, so do your best to strike an appropriate balance for yourself. Certain parts of your day—like the times that you rise, work, eat, and sleep—can easily be consistent from one day to the next, while other times of day can provide for some variation and spontaneity. Start your day with a short but invigorating morning routine. It is generally appropriate to sleep a little later in the winter, but you will feel fresher and more motivated if you are up by about 7 a.m. Brush your teeth, scrape your tongue, swish warm Sesame Oil in your mouth and massage it into your gums. Treat your skin to a warm Sesame Oil massage, and then take a hot shower to rinse off any excess. After that, you can drink some warm water to cleanse and awaken the digestive system. Administer a few drops of Nasya Oil to the nasal passages to awaken the mind and keep the respiratory passages clear. Shake off any sluggishness with some morning exercise or yoga. Dress in bright, warming colors like reds and oranges and always cover your ears, neck, and head with a scarf or hat, if you are outside in the cold.4 Skip daytime naps; the long, dark, evening hours provide a perfect atmosphere for you to relax and unwind. Your body may also tolerate a little more nighttime sleep and/or increased sexual activity through the winter months. Plan on retiring around 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. and, before bed, apply some Sesame Oil to your scalp and to the soles of your feet to facilitate restful sleep.

Winter Exercise

Exercise is one of the best ways to support optimal physical and mental health through the winter months. If vata is predominant in the atmosphere—with dry, cold weather, and increased isolation—you will want to favor a slow, gentle, and strengthening exercise routine. If on the other hand, kapha is the more influential force at any given time—with heavy, cloudy weather, and rain or snow—you will want to push yourself physically, increasing both the duration and intensity of your work-out. It’s important to listen to your body this winter. If you’re feeling overextended and stretched, favor vata-pacifying types of exercise like walking, tai chi, or gentle yoga. If you’re feeling sluggish and heavy, give kapha a bit of a push with a more vigorous workout—perhaps a bike ride, a jog, or a challenging hike, snowshoe, or ski. Either way, the best time to exercise is in the morning, from 6–10 a.m. If that doesn’t work with your schedule, you can exercise in the evening hours, from 6–10 p.m.

Winter Yoga

An invigorating and expansive yoga practice this winter can be surprisingly supportive of your overall wellbeing. Appropriate poses include Sun Salutation (Surya Namaskar), Warrior I(Virabhadrasana I), Warrior II (Virabhadrasana II), Reverse Warrior (Viparita Virabhadrasana), as well as forward bends, and backward bends. Postures that stimulate metabolism like Cobra(Bhujangasana), Bow (Dhanurasana), Side Plank (Vasisthasana), Spinal RollsLeg Lifts, and supine twists like Revolved Abdomen Variation (Jathara Parivartanasana Variation) are also very appropriate. For instructions on these and a number of other supportive winter poses, click here. You can adapt your pace on a daily basis to coincide with your local climate and your internal needs. If vata is predominant in the atmosphere or if you feel stressed and depleted, move at a slow and gentle pace. If kapha is a stronger influence or if you feel unmotivated and lethargic, move at a faster pace, allowing your breath to quicken and your inner heat to intensify. Either way, practice with purpose and invite precision into your poses. Have an expansive heart and hold your poses long enough to feel challenged. If you’re trying to balance vata, close your practice with a long Corpse (Savasana) pose. Or, if kapha is high, consider Corpse with Support (Savasana Variation). If you practice pranayama, Kapalabhati (Skull Shining Breath), Bhastrika (Bellows Breath), and Surya Bhedana (Solar Breath) will bring a sense of lightness to the mind and are all wonderful for increasing heat, circulation, and the digestive capacity. Full Yogic Breath and Nadi Shodhana (Alternate Nostril Breathing) are especially balancing in cases of high vata or stress.

Spring Guide

Winter’s accumulated snow and ice are beginning to melt. Gentle rains soak the land. The earth itself seems heavy with moisture—saturated with it—and the landscape is becoming a wellspring of life. Spring is a season of birth, new beginnings, renewal, and growth—a time for the earth to make manifest the latent potential within all things. Seeds are germinating, flowers budding, insects buzzing, leaves unfurling. And despite our growing separation from the natural world, we are deeply affected by this gentle stirring around us. Our physiology senses a natural opportunity for a fresh, clean start; our bodies are primed to lighten things up, cleanse ourselves of any accumulated imbalances, and rejuvenate our deepest tissues. As the natural world emerges from its long winter slumber, it is common to experience a renewed sense of joy and inspiration. But for many, the spring season is also associated with colds, congestion, hay fever, and allergies. Thankfully, an appropriate seasonal routine can help us to overcome spring’s challenges while promoting optimal health so that we can truly celebrate the gifts this season has to offer.

Spring: A Distinctly Kapha Season

Spring is a season characterized by warmth (or at least less cold), moisture, and a palpable softness. It is a season revered for its gentle, nurturing presence. Spring embodies the heaviness of increased moisture, and it tends to feel slower than, say, summer or fall. These are just a few of the characteristics that align spring with kapha. In fact, the Sanskrit word kapha, means ‘that which flourishes in water,’ and what season is more defined by the presence of water than spring? Clearly, the spring season and kapha dosha have a great deal in common.

Ayurveda teaches us that like increases like. So by its very nature, springtime tends to increase kapha. And when we consider that by winter’s end, a bit of kapha accumulation is somewhat inevitable for most of us, spring has the potential to add insult to injury in the kapha department. But just as spring melts the lingering ice and snow, it liquefies accumulated kapha (ideally, so that it can be eliminated from the body). This process can either be a revitalizing event or it can trigger a number of health challenges. A seasonal routine is actually one of our best tools for minimizing spring’s kapha-aggravating potential while supporting the elimination of any accumulated excess. With a seasonal diet and lifestyle that invites a little extra lightness, sharpness, dryness, and heat into our lives, we can support our physiology in its natural process of springtime renewal and revitalization.

But remember that the entire point of an Ayurvedic seasonal routine is to align ourselves with the dynamic rhythms of the natural world. Mother nature moves in a fluid and organic way and spring is a season of transition, so a springtime routine is not intended to be rigid or static. Your local spring climate may, at first, fluctuate between colder, drier, more isolating wintery weather, and warmer, wetter conditions—meaning that any given day could aggravate kapha, vata, or both. Then, as the season progresses and the weather heats up, you may find yourself needing to pacify kapha, pitta, or a combination of the two. Obviously these patterns vary, depending on where you live. Whatever the nuances of your local climate, you can respond to the qualities that are showing up by sprinkling in appropriate recommendations from the Ayurvedic Guide to the Winter Season (to help pacify vata when necessary) or the Ayurvedic Guide to the Summer Season (to help pacify pitta when necessary). Adapting your spring routine on a day-to-day basis like this is a beautiful way to honor the subtle variations within the season.

General Recommendations for a Joyful and Renewing Spring

The following information is meant to introduce you to the principles at the heart of a springtime routine.  It will also provide you with the foundational tools required to begin to piece together a routine of your own. It may be helpful to familiarize yourself with the common manifestations of kapha imbalance so that you can address them quickly, if they do arise. And, if you know your constitution, you can further refine your springtime routine to more specifically support your body type. After you’ve read the general information that follows, click on your Ayurvedic body type (links below) for further considerations specific to your constitution.

A Supportive Spring Diet

Many people notice a natural, but distinct, shift in their cravings as winter gives way to spring. The arrival of the warmer weather often marks a decline in our desire for the heavy, substantive foods so essential during the winter months. In fact, many notice an increasingly insistent preference for lighter fare. Your appetite may decrease and you may find yourself craving fruit, fresh vegetables, and salads galore. This is your body’s way of telling you that it’s time for some spring-cleaning. In fact, spring is a perfect time of year for a cleanse. Juice fasts with pomegranate or apple juice, and mono-diets are wonderfully supportive. But even outside the confines of a structured dietary cleanse, you can support your body’s natural desire to purify and renew by favoring the pungent, bitter, and astringent tastes and by eating warm, light foods that are relatively easy to digest. These habits help to balance mucus production, regulate moisture levels, and serve to open the channels of elimination so critical for purification. You can further support the process by drinking room temperature, warm, or hot beverages. You might even consider sipping on some warm water with a dab of honey throughout the day. Structure your diet around eating lots of fresh (but not necessarily raw) vegetables and a variety of legumes. These foods tend to be astringent and often somewhat bitter. You really can’t go wrong with vegetables, as long as you don’t overdo the heavy or watery veggies like avocado, cucumber, olives, sweet potato, squash or zucchini—which should be reduced. You can start your day with a light breakfast of fresh fruit or tea. Lunches and dinners of light, cooked grains, steamed vegetables, and legumes are often perfect choices. Many also benefit from eating lots of bitter greens, cabbage family vegetables (cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.), and spicy foods like green chilies. Eaten in moderation, freshwater fish, tofu, and poached or hardboiled eggs are also appropriate during the spring season. You can enhance your meals with the pungent flavor of onions, garlic, ginger, black pepper, chili pepper, small amounts cayenne pepper, and an unlimited variety of herbs and spices.

At the same time, gradually reduce your intake of heavy, oily or fried foods. Try to curtail any tendency to overeat or snack between meals, and place less emphasis on the sweet, sour, and salty tastes. Heavy or sour fruits like oranges, bananas, pineapples, figs, dates, coconuts, and melons are also best reduced. Use very little oil or ghee when cooking and, if necessary, substitute water to prevent sticking. Do your best to minimize your intake of dairy products—especially in the morning—as they can be quite congesting. Rice milk and almond milk are good substitutes. If you do have cow’s milk, boil it first, take it warm, and consider adding a pinch of turmeric or ginger to make it more digestible (and less congesting). Similarly, you may feel lighter and more invigorated if you eat less meat; beef, pork, seafood, and duck can be particularly aggravating at this time of year. Other foods that are best avoided during the spring include fast foods, sweets, soy products, nuts, excessive amounts of bread, and chilled or refrigerated foods—especially when eaten cold. If at all possible, eliminate iced or chilled drinks, ice cream, and popsicles altogether.

The following is a list of ideal spring foods:1, 2

Fruits to Favor

  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries
  • Cranberries
  • Dried Fruit
  • Lemons
  • Limes
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Pomegranates
  • Prunes (soaked)
  • Raisins
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries

Vegetables to Favor

  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Bell Peppers
  • Beets & Beet Greens
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chard
  • Chilies
  • Collard Greens
  • Corn
  • Dandelion Greens
  • Endive
  • Garlic
  • Green Beans
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Onion
  • Peas
  • Potatoes, white
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Sprouts
  • Turnips

Grains to Favor

  • Amaranth
  • Barley
  • Buckwheat
  • Corn
  • Rice Cakes
  • Rye
  • Seitan
  • Tapioca

Legumes to Favor

  • Aduki Beans
  • Bean Sprouts
  • Black Beans
  • Black-Eyed Peas
  • Garbanzo Beans
  • Navy Beans
  • Pinto Beans
  • Tempeh
  • Tur Dal
  • White Beans

Seeds to Favor

  • Popcorn
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Sunflower Seeds

Dairy to Favor (All in Moderation)

  • Cottage Cheese
  • Goat’s Milk
  • Yogurt

Animal Products to Favor (If You Eat Them)

  • Eggs
  • Freshwater Fish
  • Poultry (white meat)
  • Rabbit
  • Shrimp
  • Venison

Oils to Favor (In Very Small Quantities)

  • Corn Oil
  • Flax Seed Oil

Sweeteners

  • Honey
  • Maple Syrup
  • Molasses

Spices to Favor

All spices will generally be very supportive through the spring season

A Supportive Spring Lifestyle

In general, you’ll benefit most from the renewing nature of the spring if you develop some focused intentions for yourself. That said, it’s equally important to embrace the light-heartedness that springtime tends to inspire. Spring is a natural time to socialize and to initiate (or rekindle) meaningful relationships—to enjoy our friends and loved ones. It is also a great time to play. As winter recedes, you can gradually begin to rise earlier. For most people, waking by or before 6am during the spring months is ideal. If you can, create a stimulating and inspiring morning routine for yourself, even if it’s short. Brush your teeth, scrape your tongue, apply a few drops of nasya oil to your nasal passages, and drink some warm water first thing in the morning. You can also massage your skin with warm, organic sesame oil and then rinse off in a hot shower. If you don’t have time for an oil massage every day, consider an invigorating dry rub before you bathe, or take a break during your shower to massage your skin with a dry, herbal powder like amalaki or chickpea flour. Either way, start at your extremities and work your way toward the torso, rubbing your skin vigorously to stimulate heat, improved lymphatic circulation, fluid balance, and healthy, supple skin. Making time for exercise or yoga first thing in the morning will also help to promote clarity and improved energy this spring. Daytime napping is not recommended. Consider drying out excess moisture and promoting a sense of lightness with a nice relaxing sit in a sauna. Also, it’s usually best to drink just enough fluid to stay hydrated. And while the nervous system will still benefit from some sense of routine throughout the day—with regular times for working, eating, sleeping, and exercise—spring is a good time to intentionally escape the status quo at other times. Try something new, embrace a sense of playfulness and adventure, and give your wild side some outlets for expression. Dress in bright, warming colors like reds, yellows, and oranges in the early spring, while the weather remains cool and wet. As the weather heats up, gradually shift toward cooling blues, greens, purples, and whites. Finally, retire for bed sometime around 11pm or even midnight. And while you won’t want to overindulge on sleep during the spring, you might tolerate a slight increase in sexual activity.

Spring Exercise

Exercise can be especially supportive in countering the heavy, wet spring season. Physical activity improves circulation, increases heat, and results in a feeling of lightness—all of which help to balance kapha. This is also a good time of year to push yourself a bit physically, with longer, more intense workouts. But please continue to be mindful of the needs of your particular constitution. Consider biking, jogging, hiking, or swimming and try to exercise in the morning, between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. If your schedule won’t accommodate a morning workout, evenings are a good time to exercise as well (again, ideally between 6 p.m. and 10 p.m.). Please check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program.

Spring Yoga

Because kapha is a predominant force in both winter and spring, there are many similarities between appropriate winter and spring yoga practices, with a few important distinctions. As in winter, many people will enjoy an expansive and stimulating spring yoga practice that is faster paced, heating, and guided by precision and muscular effort. In the spring, the emphasis on cleansing the lungs and warming the kidneys increases. Keep the chest open and the heart space expanded and, when you feel as though you’ve been in a pose long enough to feel challenged, take one more deep, steady breath before releasing the posture. Include asanas like sun salutation, warrior I, warrior II, reverse warrior, forward bends, chest openers, and backward bends as well as poses that stretch, compress, stimulate, and cleanse the solar plexus like cobra, bow, side plank, spinal rolls, leg lifts, and twists. For instructions on these and a number of other balancing spring asanas, click here. Spring is also a wonderful time to reap the benefits of pranayama. In fact, according to some teachers, pranayama alone can rid the body of impurities.3Kapalabhati and bhastrika will bring a sense of lightness to the mind and are both very cleansing practices—perfect for the spring season. Close your yoga practice with a shorter shavasana and consider placing a bolster under your chest for increased benefit.

PITTA – SUMMER SEASON GUIDELINES

 The following recommendations for pitta are appropriate for most people during the summer.

Light. Fire. Heat. Intensity. It’s summertime! Do you worship long days of bright sunlight? Do you welcome a renewed feeling of lightness and expansive consciousness? Maybe you just can’t get enough of the hot summer temperatures. Or, do you dread the heat and go out of your way to avoid the summer sun? Perhaps a dark, air-conditioned movie theater is more your speed on a hot summer day.

Summer, like each of the seasons, arrives with its own distinct personality. Depending on your constitution, summer may increase your internal sense of harmony, or it may aggravate one of your innate tendencies. For example, a hot-natured individual who prefers a cool climate may love the winter, but will feel hotter than most—to the point of discomfort—as the heat of summer intensifies. On the other hand, someone with chronically cold hands and feet, who never seems to be able to stay warm in the winter months, will experience exactly the opposite: long, cold winters will be a challenge and s/he will relish the heat of summer. But the seasons need not be an intrinsic source of fluctuating dread and euphoria.

One of the fundamental principles of Ayurveda is that our habits, routines, and dietary choices should ebb and flow with the seasons. We can support an improved state of balance throughout the year by making a conscious effort to live in harmony with the cycles of nature and by regularly adjusting our lifestyle and habits to accommodate the arrival of each new season. While this idea may at first seem daunting, many people find that the recommended seasonal adjustments come quite naturally and that a few simple changes can dramatically increase health and vitality.

In Ayurveda, it is said that like increases like and that opposites balance; this helps to explain why summertime stirs something different in each of us. If you know your constitution, you can actually take even more personalized steps to harmonize your internal landscape with the changing nature of the seasons.

Summer: The Pitta Season

The most striking characteristics of summer—the heat, the long days of bright sun, the sharp intensity, and the transformative nature of the season—are directly in line with pitta, which is why summer is considered a pitta season. And, despite the fact that some climates are exceptionally humid this time of year, the cumulative effect of intense heat is to dry things out, so summer is also considered dry.1 On a more subtle level, summer is a time of expansion and mobility—traits more characteristic of vata. While there is plenty to celebrate about summer’s unique personality, it’s possible to have too much of a good thing. A summer seasonal routine is aimed at fostering diet and lifestyle habits that will help to prevent the over-accumulation of summer qualities and allow you to enjoy the unique gifts that summertime has to offer.

Negotiating a Blissful Summer: General Recommendations for the Pitta Season

Your primary focus through the summer months will be to keep pitta balanced by staying cool, mellowing intensity with relaxation, and grounding your energy. It may also be helpful to learn to recognize early signs of pitta imbalance so that you can take steps to address those quickly, if they arise. But summer has some distinctly vata characteristics as well, so you’ll also want to stay hydrated, foster stability, and balance vata’s natural expansiveness and mobility with quiet, restful activities.

Pitta Season Diet

During the summer, our bodies naturally crave light foods and small meals that are easy to digest because the digestive fire—a strong source of internal heat—disperses in order to help keep us cool.1 Being fully present with your meals while savoring the flavor and texture of your food will help minimize the risk of overeating. Summer is a time to favor the sweet, bitter, and astringent tastes and to relish in cool, liquid, even slightly oily foods.2 This is the best time of year to enjoy fresh fruits and salads. It is also a great time to indulge in sweet dairy products such as milk, butter, ghee, cottage cheese, fresh homemade yogurt, and even ice cream on occasion.3 All unrefined sweeteners except honey and molasses are cooling and can be enjoyed in moderation during the summer months.

In the way of beverages to beat the heat, enjoy cool or room temperature water infused with mint or lime and a little raw sugar, a sweet lassi, cooling herbal teas such as peppermint, licorice, fennel or rose, or an occasional beer. Iced drinks are best avoided; they disturb the digestive fire and create toxins in the body.

Go easy on sour or unripe fruits, aged cheeses, and heating vegetables and spices such as carrots, beets, radishes, onions, garlic, ginger, and mustard seeds. Try to avoid extremely spicy foods like chilies or cayenne pepper altogether. Also keep in mind that raw vegetables (as in salads) will be better digested if they are eaten at lunch, rather than at dinner.

Below is a list of some ideal summer foods:

Fruits to Favor

  • Apples
  • Avocados
  • Berries
  • Cherries
  • Coconut
  • Cranberries
  • Grapes
  • Limes
  • Mangoes
  • Melons
  • Pears
  • Pineapples
  • Plums
  • Pomegranates
  • Prunes

Vegetables to Favor

  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Beet Greens
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chard
  • Collard Greens
  • Cucumbers
  • Green Beans
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Okra
  • Potatoes
  • Watercress
  • Zucchini

Grains to Favor

  • Barley
  • Wheat

Legumes to Favor

  • Adzuki Beans
  • Black Beans
  • Soy Beans & Products
  • Split Peas

Oils to Favor

  • Olive Oil

Spices and Garnishes to Favor

  • Lime
  • Mint
  • Parsley

Animal Products to Favor (If You Eat Them)

  • Fish (freshwater)
  • Poultry (white)
  • Shrimp

Sweeteners

  • Maple Syrup
  • Unrefined Cane Sugar
  • Turbinado

Pitta Season Lifestyle Choices

Summertime is bursting with vibrant energy and most people find it easier to rise early in the morning at this time of year. This is a natural and beneficial rhythm to embrace. Early morning is also the best time for exercise. Before you bathe, massage the skin with a light coating of a pitta soothing oil, like coconut or sunflower oil, to calm the nervous system and cool the body.2Essential oils of jasmine and khus are good fragrances for the summer or you may enjoy a rose water spritz to calm, cool, and refresh your mind.

Dressing in light, breathable clothing made of cotton or silk and favoring cooling colors like whites, grays, blues, purples, and greens will help you counter the intensity and heat. Summer is ideal for spending time in nature, but when you do go outside, wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses to shelter yourself from the intense sun. On especially hot days, there is often an afternoon lull in energy and you may find that a short nap is beneficial.

In the evening before bed, wash and dry the feet and massage them with a light coating of brahmi oil to ground your energy and draw the heat down. It is best to retire by 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. to avoid an overly stimulated mind,1 and lying on your right side will activate the lunar pathway in the left nostril, which is calming and cooling. Also be aware that sexual activity, in excess, can provoke pitta and deplete energy, so cultivate moderation in this aspect of your life during the summer months.

Pitta Season Exercise

Summer can motivate improved physical fitness and it is generally a great season to be active, provided you exercise at appropriate times and at an appropriate intensity. Exercise is very heating and, at this time of year, is best avoided during the heat of the day, especially from 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Instead, try exercising early in the morning, when the atmosphere is crisp and cool. It’s also important not to push too hard. Ideally, exercise at about 50–70% of your capacity, breathing through your nose the entire time, if you can. Follow your workout with a drop of rose oil to the third eye, throat, and navel to help the body cool down.

 

Pitta Season Yoga

Pitta is fiery and intense; you can balance the pitta season by simply adjusting your yoga practice to calm pitta’s tendencies. Allow your routine to be guided by relaxed effort: move gently, fluidly, and gracefully, keeping the gaze soft and the breath stable. Cultivate a calm inner awareness rather than pushing yourself to maximum capacity with precision and sharp muscular effort. Check yourself frequently to ensure that you’re not straining in your practice. Focus on creating a sense of groundedness and flow rather than becoming static in the poses.

Since the solar plexus tends to hold heat, favor asanas that massage, strengthen, and wring out the abdominal region such as cat/cow, cobra, boat, side openers, and twists. Cooling, self-referencing poses such as child’s pose and forward bends are also very beneficial during the pitta season, as are gentle flows such as moon salutation. Always close your practice with a few minutes in shavasana to ground your energy and integrate the benefits of practicing yoga. For instructions on any of these poses and more information on yoga most suitable to pitta season.

NAMASTE

 

200 hr Yoga Teacher Training – Ibiza

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YTT

“Unique and comprehensive Yoga & Ayurveda training for the modern Yogi”

The LilyPod Yoga & Ayurveda Teacher Training Course is a spiritual practice in its own right, developed and guided under the guidance of an experienced yoga teacher / therapist with the assistance of Dr. Venkata N joshia MD, PhD. Ayurveda, from India based in Croydon and practicing in both Croydon and London, UK.  WEBSITE CLICK HERE 

Our Specialized Yoga & Ayurveda YTT has been designed with a keen and thoughtful therapeutic approach in light of application of all 8 Limbs of Yoga as prescribed by Sri Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras for a fully integrated and holistic style of teaching PEOPLE not just asana.

Students of our LilyPod YTT not only learn to teach confidentially asana flows but are also able to incorporate aspects of Indian Hindu Philosophy to their teachings, basic Sanskrit, chanting & nada yoga principles, give guidance to doshic imbalances via yoga and lifestyle therapy application as well as application of Ayurveda concepts into not only their own lives but the lives of those they contact.

More info, drop us a line: lily@lilypodyoga.com

Or check out our LILYPOD YOGA WEBSITE

SPACES LIMITED

HARI OM

http://lilypodyoga.com/yoga-teacher-trainings/

Free Ayurvedic Home Cleanse Program, Yoga & Ayurveda Retreat May 14-21, 200hr YTT Ibiza Nov 1-22

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http://lilypodyoga.com/yoga-teacher-trainings/

 

Free Ayurvedic Home Cleanse Program, info HERE

Yoga & Ayurveda Retreat May 14-21, info LilyPod Retreats

200hr YTT Ibiza Nov 1-22, info LilyPod Yoga Teacher Trainings

http://lilypodyoga.com/yoga-teacher-trainings/

Our YTT in Ibiza March is FULL. Next one: Fall 2016

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If you are interested in becoming a Yoga teacher with emphasis on Ayurveda, please drop us a line to inquire about our next training in Ibiza, Fall 2016.

Spaces limited to 10 students🙂

Check out our curriculum and info on our site Yoga Teacher Training Fall 2016

LilyPod Yoga School YTT Kerala February 2016

OM RITAM NAMAHA

Fresh Coconut and Almond Stir Fry – A Vata Recipe

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https://lilypodyoga.wordpress.com

A satisfying way to prepare young Thai coconut meat that’s somewhat reminiscent of calamari with Thai-style spices.
This recipe is vegan if you use sunflower or coconut oil, gluten-free, and great for Vata and Pitta doshas.

Ingredients:
Flesh from 2 young coconuts, sliced into thin strips about 2 inches long
3 tablespoons ghee, sunflower oil, or coconut oil
1/3 cup smoked almonds or almonds lightly baked in Braggs amino acids or tamari, chopped
2 tablespoons finely chopped leek
2 green zucchinis, sliced wafer thin
2 carrots, sliced wafer thin
2 teaspoons lime juice
2 teaspoons tomato puree or organic ketchup
2 tablespoons Braggs amino acids
1/3 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground
1 teaspoon paprika
1 tablespoon fresh ground fennel seed
2 teaspoons Chef Johnny’s Vata seasoning
1/2 -1 cup vegetable stock or filtered water
2 teaspoons fresh turmeric root, grated
1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, grated
2 tablespoons fresh basil or 1 tablespoon dried basil
2 tablespoons fresh fennel fronds or parsley or thyme

Directions:
Melt the ghee or oil in a saucepan on medium heat; add the leek, ginger, turmeric, and fennel seeds; sauté and stir for 3-4 minutes. Add the coconut meat strips and sauté for 5 minutes; then add Vata spices, carrot, and zucchini; and stir. Place a lid on the pan and lower heat.
After 4 minutes, add the almonds, spices and herbs, Braggs, tomato puree, salt and pepper. Keep stirring and simmer for 4 to 5 minutes, adding stock in small quantities to keep the dish from becoming dry.
Serve with quinoa, stir fried rice, steamed rice, kitchari, or noodles, and a small salad.

Makes 4 servings

200hr Yoga Teacher Training in Ibiza March 2016 w emphasis on Ayurveda Therapy

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200hr YOGA TEACHER TRAINING IN IBIZA, SPAIN

NOVEMBER 1st – 22nd, 2016

YTT

YOGA & AYURVEDA Fundamentals course for Yoga teachers, therapists and/or health professionals.

200 hr Yoga Teacher Training with emphasis in Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy.

IMPORTANT NOTE: There is a limit to 10 participants on this course :-)

The LilyPod Yoga & Ayurveda Teacher Training Course is a spiritual practice in its own right, developed and guided under the guidance of an experienced yoga teacher / therapist with the assistance of Dr. Venkata N joshia MD, PhD. Ayurveda, from India based in Croydon and practicing in both Croydon and London, UK.

Our Specialized Yoga & Ayurveda YTT has been designed with a keen and thoughtful therapeutic approach in light of application of all 8 Limbs of Yoga as prescribed by Sri Patanjali in the Yoga Sutras for a fully integrated and holistic style of teaching PEOPLE not just asana.

Students of our LilyPod YTT not only learn to teach confidentially asana flows but are also able to incorporate aspects of Indian Hindu Philosophy to their teachings, basic Sanskrit, chanting & nada yoga principles, give guidance to doshic imbalances via yoga and lifestyle therapy application as well as application of Ayurveda concepts into not only their own lives but the lives of those they contact.

FOR MORE INFO PLS VISIT OUR LILYPOD WEBSITE

For queries, pls use the form below…

Namaste

http://lilypodyoga.com/yoga-teacher-trainings/

LilyPod Newsletter – Yoga Retreat Ibiza – YTT in Kerala Feb 2016 –

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LilyPod Yoga & Ayurveda Retreat October Ibiza - YTT Kerala February 2016

:::Ayurveda & Yoga Retreat:::

IBIZA – Sat Oct 3rd – Sat Oct 10th, 2015

“To have FAITH,
Is to have Wings”
– J.M Barrie

-Nurture by Nature. – Ayurveda as the oldest medicine known to human kind offers us the tools to help us deal with the issues of a modern lifestyle and a busy mind. – Ibiza provides the most enchanting of settings as well as special healing energy to create the space both inside and out to regenerate, rejuvenate and rebirth. We will dive a little deeper into the ancient tradition to re-discover our true nature and reignite our spark!!
We will have 21 hrs of Yoga all together which is ample time to elevate ur practice to new heights, 2 Ayurveda talks, 1 Ayurvedic cooking workshop, 1 jar of ancient medicine “Chyawanprash” which in Ayurveda is considered a “Rasayana” rejuvenator and plenty of LOVE.

Benefits of Chyawanprash

  • Rejuvenates all tissues in the body*
  • Increases overall strength and energy*
  • Improves muscle mass*
  • Builds ojas for healthy immune response and youthfulness*
  • Strengthens the heart and respiratory systems*
  • Tonifies the reproductive system*
  • Kindles Agni (digestive fire)*
  • Gently encourages elimination*
  • Supports optimal urinary health*

LilyPod Yoga School YTT Kerala February 2016

200 HR – 1 month intensive – YOGA TEACHER TRAINING – With emphasis on AYURVEDA in  KERALA, India
 FEBRUARY 2016. 

We are “Yoga Alliance Certified”
Only 10 spots available.
Om Shanti

Please have a look at our curriculum HERE and if you have any queries pls drop us a line at: lily@lilypodyoga.com

For anyone who is contemplating on “Becoming a Yoga Teacher” this is an epic opportunity to explore not only the roots of Yoga from a classical point of view but also to visit the place of birth of its sister science: AYURVEDA.

One month long teacher trainings are intense in many more ways than one, simultaneously providing you with the full spectrum of the practices in the sense that you will be living them day in and day out. From the moment you rise an hour before sun rise to sit in meditation and feel nature come alive, to the second you drop in bed from exhaustion from a full days work. Worth every second of it.
This program has been designed also for those with a keen heart for therapy as we focus on the therapeutic aspects of Yoga by fully understanding its connection to Ayurveda and how they are meant to be taught together not apart.
“A Yogi lifestyle is an Ayurvedic lifestyle,
An Ayurvedic lifestyle is a Yogic lifestyle”.

The course will take place in a traditional Ayurvedic retreat/clinic which has been so for many generations.
Ayurvedic treatments will be available as well as an opportunity to enrol in PANCHA KARMA. The Ayurvedic approach to deep cleansing.

We will also visit the famous “Back waters” by boat which is a must do when one visits this part of the precious Mother Earth.

An adventure of a lifetime.

Om.

LilyPod YTT Kerala February 2016

Adaptive Resilience & Mindfulness Workshops coming to IBIZA!
Working with Dr. Peter Gruenewald who currently works in the Adaptive Resilience Ltd.

Saïd Business School, a the University of Oxford, UK & Nigel John Agger who also lives and works in the UK, is an avid researcher and developer in the areas of music & sound as healing, psychotherapy, and a former Veterinarian.
We will be running workshops hopefully starting this August in the areas of mindfulness meditation and adaptive sound therapy.
Om Ritam Namaha 
NAMASTE
AYURVEDIC TIPS TO KEEP U COOL:Taste: Bitter, sweet, and astringent tastes calm pitta, so eat more foods like apples, grapes, zucchini, lettuce, cucumbers, cilantro, and fresh organic dairy. Eliminate or reduce your intake of alcohol, heavy meats, and fried, oily, salty, spicy, and sour foods. Instead of salt, use fennel seeds, coriander, fenugreek, and fresh lime juice for seasoning.

Touch: Wear breathable natural fibers that have a cooling effect, such as cotton and linen.

Smell: Treat yourself to a fresh bouquet of tuberose, gardenia, or freesia. Or dab on a diluted essential oil: Try rose, jasmine, geranium, vetiver, or ylang ylang.

Sight: Take a break from work that requires intense visual focus. Gaze at summer’s verdant trees and meadows. Surround yourself with cooling hues of pearl white, blue, green, silver, and gray.

Sound: Listen to flute music and devotional songs to calm your heart and soothe your spirit.

Pranayama: Try cooling pranayama techniques, like Sitali and Sitkari, which are done by inhaling through the mouth and exhaling through the nose.

To do Sitali, sit in a comfortable position, make an O shape with your mouth, and curl the tongue lengthwise. Then, as B.K.S. Iyengar instructs in Light on Pranayama, “draw in air…as if drinking with a straw and fill the lungs completely.” Withdraw the tongue, close the mouth, and hold the breath for five to 10 seconds. Exhale through the nose. Repeat this cycle for five to 10 minutes and then rest in Savasana (Corpse Pose).

If you can’t curl your tongue, try Sitkari, which is similar to Sitali except that the tongue is kept flat. Part the lips and allow the tip of the tongue to protrude slightly. Practice gently and without intensity early or late in the day, when the air is cool.

dreams

Ayurvedic / Hiking Retreat in Es Vedra with Liilamaya & Lucien

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LilyPod Yoga & Ayurveda

This retreat is a unique opportunity to discover a magical place on planet earth as well as to learn about the most ancient natural way of self-healing through Yoga’s sisters science Ayurveda.

You will stay in an absolute magnificent and magnetic place in Ibiza, in front of the world’s 3rd most magnetic powerspot. The purifying and intensifying quality of this nature reserve will help you connect with the elements, be well focused and will strengthen your intentions for this week.

In This 7 day retreat you will learn about your own personal constitution AKA “Dosha” in Sanskrit and walk away with your own personal lifestyle plan through an Ayurvedic assessment during a 2,5 hour private sessions with Liilamaya.

Dates : Sept. 26 – Oct. 3rd 2015

Included in this retreat is
– 7 nights stay in the Villa or Hotel at the beach on double room. Additional € 50,- P/N…

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